On “Person-First Language”: It’s Time to Actually Put the Person First - The "person-first language" rule was created to put the person first, not a disability or diagnosis. But it doesn't.
What’s in a Word: white supremacy - Sometimes you don't need a dictionary, you need a radical copyeditor. In this issue: what does "white supremacy" really mean?
Radical Vocabulary: Post-Election Words to Know - Sometimes you need a radical dictionary. In this issue: radical definitions of trending words since the election.
What’s in a Word: white nationalism - Sometimes you don't need a dictionary, you need a radical copyeditor. In this issue: what does "white nationalism" mean? And should I use it?
The New York Times, Radically Copyedited: Reporting on Bias - In this edition of "radically copyedited," a New York Times article gets called out for false equivalence in reporting on bias.
What’s in a Word: alt-right - Sometimes you don't need a dictionary, you need a radical copyeditor. In this issue: what does "alt-right" mean? And should I use it?
"Correctness" isn't sacred and sensitivity isn't something to be shunned. Full description of pic below. Part 5: It’s Time to Put “Political Correctness” Back Where It Belongs - "Politically correct" is not a term to use if you care about sensitive language. Instead of asking, "Am I being politically correct?" ask yourself, "Am I being respectful and caring toward all?"
"Politically correct" focuses on individualism instead of system oppression. Full description of pic below. Part 4: There’s No Such Thing as Being “Oversensitive” over Violence, Trauma, and Oppression - The term "politically correct" blames people who suffer from oppression and trauma for being "oversensitive" to harmful language.
"Politically correct" focuses on words instead of communal care. Full description of pic below. Part 3: We Need to Care More about People than about Words - The term "politically correct" focuses on restricting words when the real issue at hand is respect and care for one another.
"Politically correct" focuses on "offense" instead of violence. Full description of pic below. Part 2: Insensitive Language Isn’t “Offensive,” It’s Harmful - The term "politically correct" focuses on whether or not language "offends" people, but the point is that language is harmful, not that it's offensive.